Improve Your Fishing Experience

__CONFIG_group_edit__{"jui0ze8y":{"name":"Paragraph","singular":"-- Text %s"},"jui0zti2":{"name":"Review Title","singular":"-- Text %s"},"jui10wbn":{"name":"Button","singular":"-- Button %s"},"jujvciqg":{"name":"Product Image","singular":"-- Image %s"},"jukvku7c":{"name":"Rating Position","singular":"-- Text %s"},"jukvl7rd":{"name":"Star Rating","singular":"-- Star Rating %s"},"jukvlivt":{"name":"Star Rating Box","singular":"-- Content Box %s"},"jul7cx0e":{"name":"Image Column","singular":"-- Column %s"},"jul7d6ge":{"name":"Description Column","singular":"-- Column %s"},"jul7dofi":{"name":"Review Columns","singular":"-- Columns %s"},"jul7dxlq":{"name":"Review","singular":"-- Content Box %s"}}__CONFIG_group_edit__
__CONFIG_local_colors__{"colors":{"d2e74":"Background","6b799":"Outside Border","7157b":"Rating Box Border","e1fc2":"Button","45c02":"Accent Color"},"gradients":{}}__CONFIG_local_colors__
__CONFIG_group_edit__{"jumog01q":{"name":"All Image(s)","singular":"-- Image %s"},"juw876oo":{"name":"All Paragraph(s)","singular":"-- Text %s"},"juw8a1hl":{"name":"All Divider(s)","singular":"-- Divider %s"},"juwgu1zi":{"name":"All Visit Website Button(s)","singular":"-- Button %s"},"juwgukat":{"name":"All Read Review Button(s)","singular":"-- Button %s"},"juwguwab":{"name":"All Image Column(s)","singular":"-- Column %s"},"juwgv34h":{"name":"All Button Column(s)","singular":"-- Column %s"},"juwgvf6z":{"name":"All Buttons Columns(s)","singular":"-- Columns %s"},"juwgw084":{"name":"All Paragraphs Column(s)","singular":"-- Column %s"},"juwgwdtu":{"name":"All Columns(s)","singular":"-- Columns %s"},"jv7zel6d":{"name":"All Title(s)","singular":"-- Text %s"},"jv7zetm8":{"name":"All Content Box(s)","singular":"-- Content Box %s"}}__CONFIG_group_edit__
__CONFIG_local_colors__{"colors":{"9e0a9":"Border","97b5e":"Button","93866":"Button Hover"},"gradients":{}}__CONFIG_local_colors__

Kayak & Fishing Safety

PFD: Personal Floatation Device



I'll be writing more about safety, but first and foremost wear your PDD, AKA Personal Floatation Device and/or life jacket.

The one I currently use is the NRS Chinook PFD Life Jacket.

I'm a big fella (5' 7" / 280 lbs) and the XL/XXL has room to spare.

Rods To Catch Big Bass

BassHoles know there are 4 primary types of rods that can be used to catch big bass:big bass

The bottom two choices — baitcasting and fly fishing — are the most difficult to master. So if you’re just starting out and want to start being a BassHole (that is, start fishing and catching big bass) tomorrow, one of the top 2 choices — spinning and spincasting — will serve you best.

What Are The Best Rods?

Great question! And the only honest answers are:rod lineup

  • That depends
  • No real way to determine
  • You decide!

Depends On What?

It depends on who you ask.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, ask 100 BassHoles what’s the best rod? And get 1 Million different answers.

I like to cast. I like to cast long distances. I can cast accurately (my buddy says I can “thread a needle). So I tend to like longer rods — 7 foot vs. 6 foot or 6 1/2 foot.

Other BassHoles find the shorter rods easier to cast accurately.

So, which will you prefer? There’s no way to know! You have to guess. And figure it out as you go forward.

How to figure it out

If possible, try out some options:

Borrow a few rods of different lengths and types (medium, medium-heavy, etc.)

3 old reels
Antique Rods & Reels: fly, spincast, spinning

Try casting the different types. See what is easiest for you. And note your hookup rate (how often you get the fish that bit your lure into the boat).

I was using medium rods. I catch fish, but sometimes they come off the hook. A BasPro buddy recommended I try a medium-heavy rod, especially for certain types of baits. I haven’t had the chance to try it out yet, but certainly look forward to doing so!

If you can’t borrow any rods, you really have little choice (unless you want to rent one) but to:

Choose one rod and discover what challenges you have, then find out how others recommend you overcome those challenges.

So if you have trouble with accuracy, would a shorter rod help? Or if you want more distance, do you need a longer rod?

As you can see, a trial and error method IS the only way to determine which rod will be best for you!

And, just to make things even MORE complicated, as your skills progress, what works for you may change as well.

But the good news is those early rods will STILL work!

So, in the end,

You Decide!

If you want advice, just want to discuss options, or simply want more background, be sure and leave me a question.rods & lures

I’ll answer what I can, research what I can’t, and tell you where we both stand on figuring this out.

We BassHoles like to stick together!

Tight lines,

Roger, The Smiling BassHole

==> Want to learn some history of fishing rods? Click here! <==



Catch-Big-Bass http://catch-big-bass.com/ is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

Rods To Catch Big Bass

BassHoles know there are 4 primary types of rods that can be used to catch big bass:big bass

The bottom two choices — baitcasting and fly fishing — are the most difficult to master. So if you’re just starting out and want to start being a BassHole (that is, start fishing and catching big bass) tomorrow, one of the top 2 choices — spinning and spincasting — will serve you best.

What Are The Best Rods?

Great question! And the only honest answers are:rod lineup

  • That depends
  • No real way to determine
  • You decide!

Depends On What?

It depends on who you ask.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, ask 100 BassHoles what’s the best rod? And get 1 Million different answers.

I like to cast. I like to cast long distances. I can cast accurately (my buddy says I can “thread a needle). So I tend to like longer rods — 7 foot vs. 6 foot or 6 1/2 foot.

Other BassHoles find the shorter rods easier to cast accurately.

So, which will you prefer? There’s no way to know! You have to guess. And figure it out as you go forward.

How to figure it out

If possible, try out some options:

Borrow a few rods of different lengths and types (medium, medium-heavy, etc.)

3 old reels
Antique Rods & Reels: fly, spincast, spinning

Try casting the different types. See what is easiest for you. And note your hookup rate (how often you get the fish that bit your lure into the boat).

I was using medium rods. I catch fish, but sometimes they come off the hook. A BasPro buddy recommended I try a medium-heavy rod, especially for certain types of baits. I haven’t had the chance to try it out yet, but certainly look forward to doing so!

If you can’t borrow any rods, you really have little choice (unless you want to rent one) but to:

Choose one rod and discover what challenges you have, then find out how others recommend you overcome those challenges.

So if you have trouble with accuracy, would a shorter rod help? Or if you want more distance, do you need a longer rod?

As you can see, a trial and error method IS the only way to determine which rod will be best for you!

And, just to make things even MORE complicated, as your skills progress, what works for you may change as well.

But the good news is those early rods will STILL work!

So, in the end,

You Decide!

If you want advice, just want to discuss options, or simply want more background, be sure and leave me a question.rods & lures

I’ll answer what I can, research what I can’t, and tell you where we both stand on figuring this out.

We BassHoles like to stick together!

Tight lines,

Roger, The Smiling BassHole

==> Want to learn some history of fishing rods? Click here! <==



Catch-Big-Bass http://catch-big-bass.com/ is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
>